Tobacco Dependence Council: Action Equals Hope
 
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Tobacco Dependence: Failure to Act = Harm

The time to act is now. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association formed a Tobacco Dependence Task Force (now a Council), held a summit, created a partnership with the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center and set a target to increase by 5% every year the 61% of psychiatric nurses surveyed who refer (assist) smokers to treatment and the 29% who provide an intensive intervention. The group developed an action plan to accomplish this goal and will periodically monitor progress in tobacco reduction.

The time to act is now. Tobacco dependence among those with mental health issues contributes to significant increases in chronic illnesses, health care costs and premature deaths. Reducing tobacco dependence must be part of recovery from harm reduction to tobacco cessation. We have the tools for effective intervention.

The time to act is now. Psychiatric nurses are trained in assessing tobacco dependence and the Council, in partnership with the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center, will help mobilize your capacity to act now. The APNA Tobacco Dependence Council will be your conduit for information, resources and communication to act to reduce tobacco dependence.

Tobacco Dependence Council Members  |  Tobacco Dependence Information Center

 


The Smoking Cessation Leadership Center offers a multitude of resources on their 100 Pioneers for Smoking Cessation Campaign page, including:

  • Free Webinars
  • Copies of past Webinars to download
  • Free copies of smoking cessation literature

Below is an example of one of the webinars offered on the site, a webinar put together by the co-chairs of our very own Tobacco Dependence Council:
Addressing Barriers to Delivering Tobacco Dependence Interventions Across Mental Health Care Settings
Daryl Sharp, PhD, APRN, BC, and Susan Blaakman, MS, APRN, BC, faculty members at the University of Rochester, School of Nursing, discuss strategies for working through barriers clinicians often face when addressing tobacco dependence among persons with mental illnesses. Dr. Sharp and Ms. Blaakman are the co-chairs of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association’s Tobacco Dependence Council, a partner of the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center.

Please feel free to share this link with colleagues.