Recovery Pearls for your Practice
Brought to you by the Recovery Council


Self Awareness Reflections

Mirror, mirror, to be fair;
Am I ready for who’s out there?
Genuine, authentic, fully present, sincere
Can I coach them through their fear?
Am I ready to engage, connect, and empathize?
Can I really imagine life through their eyes?
Can I get past my own feelings, distractions, and noise?
Do I truly have something to give, unassuming, and with poise?
Will I preach, coerce, lecture, or rule?
Or let self-empowerment be their tool?

Connie Noll MA, BSN, RN-BC

Trauma Informed Care

Trauma Informed Care is a recovery concept that emerged from consumers when feeling re-traumatized by the use of interventions such as restraints. Trauma is defined as a personal experience of violence from abuse, neglect or witnessed acts of violence1.  Nurses can lead the way in creating a trauma informed system by promoting a collaborative environment, accepting of the client’s behaviors/responses, and understanding that every person in treatment settings has a trauma history.

1.  National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors.

Jeffery Ramirez PhD, PMHNP

Words to Retire

"Words are important. If you want to care for something, you call it a 'flower'; if you want to kill something, you call it a 'weed'." - Don Coyhis
Retire words that demean and stigmatize recovering individuals. Be respectful, promote trust, empower, and support recovery.
Words to Retire   Words to Use
Refused
Declined
Resisted Chose not to
Client believes Client States
Manipulative Seeking alternative methods of meeting needs
Noncompliant Not in agreement with / Difficulty following treatment recommendations
Unmotivated
Bored

Carolyn Baird, DNP, MBA,  RN-BC, CARN-AP, ICCDPD

Empowerment

As a concept of recovery, empowerment is closely aligned with the concept of self actualization, the ultimate ability to determine, direct and meet goals in life. As psychiatric nurses, we allow consumers the freedom and security necessary to take hold of the  hope, and begin recognizing their ability to empower themselves by partnering, listening, educating, and caring. When the consumer senses caring and security, the shadows of mental illness begin to crumble.

Pat Graham, RN, MSN, PMHCNS-BC, PMHNP-BC

A Meaningful Life as a Component of Recovery

A “meaningful life” describes a person’s satisfaction with life and feelings of purpose. A meaningful life is about engaging in activities and with people that the person loves and that matter to him or her. Helping consumers to identify and pursue personal meaning in his or her life (for example, working at a part-time job, having the energy to play with grandchildren, or managing medications independently) will help promote recovery.

For more information explore these resources on the APNA Website: Putting Recovery into Practice, Shedding the Label…, Guide to Person-Centered Excellence.

Shedding the Label…,

Jennifer Barut, MSN, RN-BC

The Lived Experience: Storytelling

Individuals with mental illnesses tell their stories in hopes that the listener understands their lived experience - that is, understands what is in their hearts, not just their "heads." Listening to someone's story requires preparation. Sorrell (2001) notes that, "in the midst of the constant noise of our modern world, we need to create sufficient silence to hear ourselves and others."

Susan Brammer, PhD, RN

A Meaningful Life as a Component of Recovery
by Jennifer Barut, MSN, RN-BC, APNA Recovery Council
A “meaningful life” describes a person’s satisfaction with life and feelings of purpose. A meaningful life is about engaging in activities and with people that the person loves and that matter to him or her. Helping consumers to identify and pursue personal meaning in his or her life (for example, working at a part-time job, having the energy to play with grandchildren, or managing medications independently) will help promote recovery.

For more information explore these resources on the APNA Website: Putting Recovery into Practice, Shedding the Label…, Guide to Person-Centered Excellence.

- See more at: http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=5315#MemberNews

A Meaningful Life as a Component of Recovery
by Jennifer Barut, MSN, RN-BC, APNA Recovery Council
A “meaningful life” describes a person’s satisfaction with life and feelings of purpose. A meaningful life is about engaging in activities and with people that the person loves and that matter to him or her. Helping consumers to identify and pursue personal meaning in his or her life (for example, working at a part-time job, having the energy to play with grandchildren, or managing medications independently) will help promote recovery.

For more information explore these resources on the APNA Website: Putting Recovery into Practice, Shedding the Label…, Guide to Person-Centered Excellence.

- See more at: http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=5315#MemberNews
Acceptance vs. Healing

Acceptance of the need for recovery is essential for self-direction through the continuum of recovery to fulfillment (McGrath, Jarrett). A new day has come: personal recovery is now paralleled by informed institutions embracing hope and recovery, rather than wholesale chronic degeneration. Recovery based healthcare moves individuals within a team from, “Houston, we have a problem” to “Houston; we have solutions”.  It starts with honesty, makes friends with the truth, and goes from there. Truth > Acceptance > Hopeful Navigation

Kathleen McCoy, DNSc, APRN-BC, PMHNP-BC, PMHCNS-BC, FNP-BC, FAANP

Build your Strengths

We can change. We know now that the plasticity of our brain can change to be more resilient. If we build our strengths, recognize our automatic thinking, develop a positive brain, and call in support, our ability to bounce back increases. Build your strengths: Strengths means we recognize what we are good at, such as if we like to learn new things, mentor others or compete. Rather than focus on our weakness — what we can’t do, what we don’t know—we can think of these things: “What am I good at?” “When have I felt strong?” “What gives me energy?” Start there.

Genevieve Chandler, RN, PhD

McGrath, P. & Jarrett, V. (2004).  A slab over my head:  Recovery Insights from a Consumer’s Perspective. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 9, 1, 61-78.