Diane Allen, MN, RN-BC, NEA-BC
2015 Award for Excellence in Leadership – RN - See more at: http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=5785#sthash.XdNVCezL.dpuf
Diane Allen, MN, RN-BC, NEA-BC
2015 Award for Excellence in Leadership – RN - See more at: http://www.apna.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=5785#sthash.XdNVCezL.dpuf

Janice GoodmanJanice H. Goodman, PhD, PMHCNS-BC
2016 Award for Excellence in Research

An experience during her undergraduate education led Janice Goodman to pursue psychiatric-mental health nursing. “My undergraduate rotation was at Cook County Hospital in Chicago,” Goodman says. “It was eye-opening: I found what I enjoyed most about my work with patients was listening and talking with them – about their experiences, their fears, about what they were thinking and feeling about what was happening to them.” From there, Goodman pursued psychiatric-mental health nursing as a way to connect with patients and discovered a passion for working with pregnant and post-partum women. For her research on perinatal mental health and holistic intervention, Janice Goodman is the recipient of the 2016 APNA Award for Excellence in Research.

At a Glance
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Passion:
Perinatal mood disorders

Words of Wisdom to Future Nurses:
“Find what excites you and pursue it. There is a vast array of opportunities – both already existing and ones you can create.  Keep learning and growing. You need to keep grounded in science and evidence, but also hone the art of working with people who are suffering and struggling.”

Favorite Color:
Green ("It represents life, nature, and growth.")

Goodman chose perinatal mental health care as a research interest after seeing the importance of mental well-being during pregnancy and early childhood. “The time period of pregnancy through the first couple years of a child’s life are crucially important both in terms of a woman’s personal development, and in regards to laying the foundation for her child’s future physical and mental health.  There is probably no other point at which one can influence so much,” Goodman explains. “Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have serious consequences for pregnant and postpartum women, the developing fetus, and the infant/child. It is therefore imperative that perinatal women suffering from psychiatric illness are offered effective treatment.” Goodman focuses her research on the use of early interventions in mood disorders to appropriately integrate psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. “Even if medication is used, therapy and other non-pharmacological interventions are almost invariably a crucial part of treatment,” she says. “Drawing from various theories and approaches, including mindfulness, child development, attachment theory, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychodynamic theory, and others, I’ve been focused on developing and testing interventions for perinatal depression and anxiety.” On her work, Danny G. Willis, one of her nominators, says, “Dr. Goodman’s research has been instrumental in advancing psychiatric nursing research and evidence-based practice in the area of women’s mental health.”

Recently, Goodman conducted a randomized controlled pilot trial of perinatal dyadic psychotherapy (PDP) for postpartum depression. Goodman’s work found that eight sessions of this home-based, nurse delivered, dyadic intervention can decrease maternal postpartum depression and improve the mother-infant relationship. “Dr. Goodman has developed groundbreaking research for preventing and treating perinatal depression and anxiety and ameliorating the impact on the crucial maternal-infant relationship,” says Linda Beeber, who nominated Goodman for the award. “Dr. Goodman’s program has also addressed prevention through the translation of infant mental health principles into a community-based intervention that targets the critical period of infant development that is most dependent on sensitive, responsive mothering.”

Goodman has shared her research through multiple publications and presentations at conferences, including the APNA Annual Conference. Her expertise in perinatal mood disorders saw her appointed as a commissioner on the Massachusetts Special Legislative Commission on Postpartum Depression. She also established the Massachusetts Postpartum Support Warmline, a resource for mothers and families navigating postpartum mental health concerns.

When Goodman looks to the future, she has a simple piece of advice for nursing students: “Find what excites you and pursue it. There is a vast array of opportunities – both already existing and ones you can create.  Keep learning and growing.  You need to keep grounded in science and evidence, but also hone the art of working with people who are suffering and struggling.” We are excited to celebrate Goodman’s research contributions to the future of psychiatric-mental health nursing at the APNA 30th Annual Conference this fall in Hartford, Connecticut.

AMERICAN PSYCHIATRIC NURSES ASSOCIATION and APNA-Logoare registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office as trademarks of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.
The American Psychiatric Nurses Association is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.