Annual Conference Pre-Conference Session Abstracts

1031: When Less is More: Deprescribing in PMHNP Practice
Lyons Hardy, PMHNP; Kirby Williams, MSN, PMHNP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Many patients end up being placed on complicated and duplicative psychotropic medication regimens over time and may present as a new patient to a PMHNP already taking a variety of medications. These regimens can be challenging to manage if the current provider considers them to be unsafe but does not want to risk destabilizing the patient by making rapid changes to the regimen. While most of us learn a great deal about prescribing in school, deprescribing is a topic that may not be addressed as frequently. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: There is little evidence to guide deprescribing practice in psychiatric practice. There are a number of guidelines and suggested practices for deprescribing in general but few publications specifically related to psychiatric care. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: Currently most PMHNPs are likely developing their own plans for deprescribing based on the individual patient needs. Some PMHNPs may be continuing regimens they are concerned about due to a lack of guidance on how to safely and effectively make changes. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: There is a lack of consistent research and evidence on the practice of deprescribing in psychiatric care. It is unknown whether PMHNPs use guidelines to help manage patients on complex medication regimens. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: This topic relates to advanced practice PMH nursing, since many PMHNPs will be managing complex medication regimens for patients who are already taking a variety of medications. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Through attending this presentation, PMHNPs will be able to develop their own personal practice of deprescribing and will have a higher level of competence in this area of psychiatric treatment.
 

1032: The Ins and Outs of Teaching Selected Essential Graduate Psychotherapy Content
Daniel Wesemann, DNP, PMHNP-BC, ARNP; Mary Moller, DNP, ARNP, PMHCNS-BC, CPRP, FAAN; Kathleen Wheeler, PhD, PMHNP-BC, APRN, FAAN

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Psychotherapy is one of the foundational interventions employed by the Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP). However due to a lack of confidence and a lack of support in their roles PMHNPs do not utilize psychotherapy as a valuable evidenced based intervention. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: There has been a ripple effect of PMHNP faculty across the nation that do not feel confident or supported in teaching psychotherapy skills to their PMHNP students. This is reflected in the NONPF survey in 2016 of PMHNP programs and the variability of how much and to what degree psychotherapy education is being provided. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: The 2013 Scope and Standards for Psychiatric Nursing, Standard 5f states that “The Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Registered Nurse conducts individual, couples, group and family psychotherapy using evidence-based psychotherapeutic frameworks and nurse-patient therapeutic relationships.” VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Vanderhoef, D. & Delaney, KR. (2017). National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties: 2016 Survey of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Programs. Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association 23(2) 159–165. Wheeler, K. (2013). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: a how-to guide for evidence-based practice. NY: Springer Publishing. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Panelists will share how they have creatively leveraged community psychiatric resources to provide quality didactic and clinical experiences for teaching psychotherapy to their graduate psychiatric nursing students. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner programs require a 4th P-Psychotherapy. Keeping psychotherapy at the soul of the PMHNP practice requires educators with knowledge and expertise to teach psychotherapy and include that information in their plans of study.
 

1033: Addressing Early Childhood Mental Disorders through the Emerging Practice of Infant Mental Health
Jessica Gordon, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC; Kathy C Gaffney, MSN, CPNP, PMHS, PMHCNS; Joy A Lauerer, DNP PMHCNS BC; Hannah Slavitt, RN, BSN, IBCLC

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Mental disorders occurring among young children, especially infants, often go unrecognized. Within early stages of childhood development both the brain and child behavior are in vulnerable states of development, with potential for endangered cognitive development to those that experience early trauma or deprivation. The practice of infant mental health protects optimal social and emotional development of infants and their families the first 3 years of life. While knowing how to promote secure attachments and normative child development is common within nursing practice, skill sets necessary to screen, assess and promote optimal IMH are not universal. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Prevalence rates are difficult to determine because of lack of awareness and difficulty assessing and diagnosing young children. Worldwide, 10 to 20% of children and adolescents experience mental disorders (World Health Organization, 2003).In the US parent-reported information from the 2011-12 National Survey of Children’s Health showed that 1 out of 7 children aged 2 to 8 years had a diagnosed mental, behavioral, or developmental disorder. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: This presentation will provide strategies for screening, assessing and providing proper intervention to promote optimal IMH. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Objectives for this presentation will be evaluated through intermittent Q&A sessions and polling participants of knowledge learned at the end of the presentation. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Outcomes of this presentation aims to enhance the knowledge and comfort of psychiatric nurses in screening, assessing and providing proper intervention for optimal IMH. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Enhancing the knowledge and comfort of psychiatric nurses in IMH is expected to reduce the global prevalence of mental health disorders in early childhood over time.
 

1034: Building Student Resilience: Changing Minds, Changing Lives An Innovative Program to Build Resilience in College-Aged Students in the Increasingly Challenging Collegiate Environment
Kristen D Lambert, PhD, MSN, RN; Genevieve Chandler, PhD, RN

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Students have demonstrated a decline in resilience that includes emotional fragility over grading, hyper-competitive relationships, cheating to meet the requirements of rigorous academic programs and a disconnection from peers, resulting in a sense of isolation and an amplified number of visits to university health centers. Students are afraid to fail and are fearful of taking initiative as external measures of success have become more important than learning. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Originally conceived as a character trait, resilience is now recognized as a practice interaction between a person and the environment. Resilience is a responsive action with adaptive qualities that can be operationalized, taught and learned. Resilience training increases coping, community connection, and academic engagement and decreases depression. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: This session will introduce participants to Changing Minds, Changing Lives, an innovative resilience intervention using a psychoeducational strengths-based approach. The key components of the program include the Chandler ABCS Model of Resilience: Active Coping, Building Strengths, Cognitive Awareness and Social Support. Participants will be introduced to an exemplar of a resilience course session to allow the opportunity to explore how resilience can be developed, nurtured and sustained in emerging adults. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Qualitative and quantitative results of pre/post surveys and participant writing. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Outcomes indicate reduced stress, and increased emotional awareness, coping, respect for differences and leadership capacity. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Academic institutions have identified that students have unprecedented challenges in their lives that require them to exercise capacities for resilience. The need for evidence-based programs to build the resilience capacity of emerging adults is significant and vital to student success.
 

1035: Preventing Violence with S.E.C.U.R.E Training (Safer Environments via Collaborative, Unified Response to Emergencies)
Diane E Allen, DNP, PMHRN-BC, NEA-BC, FACHE; Frank N Harris, LT

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Emergencies involving violence and aggression are increasing in healthcare settings. Healthcare professionals and community law enforcement personnel must collaborate in order to assure a clear, orderly and effective response during violent events that can't be managed with clinical interventions. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Nurses and law enforcement personnel have worked together in an acute psychiatric hospital to develop plans and policies that support a unified response to emergencies involving violence and aggression (Allen, Harris & deNesnera, 2014). As a result, injuries to staff from assaults have decreased 70% over ten years. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: SECURE training actively engages healthcare and law enforcement professionals in discussions aimed at fostering mutual understanding, forging collaborative relationships and developing shared strategies for managing violence. Similarities and differences in decision drivers, approaches, roles, expectations and levels of authority are explored. Factors that contribute to violent episodes and interventions that decrease the likelihood of injuries are highlighted. Participants identify opportunities to share knowledge and learn from each other about violence prevention. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Evaluations and testimonials from participants provide evidence of increased communication and collaboration between hospital and law enforcement personnel. Specific outcomes are better understanding of each other’s roles and expectations, improved lines of communication and establishment of sustainable, dynamic, working relationships. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Familiarity and mutual understanding between clinicians and law enforcement personnel promotes a higher level of collaboration before, during and after emergencies involving aggression and violence. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Participating hospitals and law enforcement agencies are now working together to build a shared database of common measures for future research on prevention of violence and aggression.
 

1036: Shame and Self- Criticism – Changing the Emotional Set Point using a Compassionate Focused Approach
Maryanne Jones Godbout, DNP, PMHCNS-BC

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Shame and self-criticism are trans-diagnostic, permeate disorders, increase vulnerability, effect expression of symptoms, elevate risk of relapse and create suffering in those who seek psychological treatment. Shame and self-criticism can be difficult to address as they are function as safety behaviors that interfere with making positive behavioral changes and meeting personal goals. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: CFT as an intervention approach fits into the contextual-behavioral therapies and draws from other bodies of science such as evolution science, affective neuroscience, and attachment. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: The core themes that guide CFT are de-shaming and de- pathlogizing the client’s experience, modeling compassion and the courage to approach and work with suffering prompt shifts from judgement to understanding and facilitation of experience of safeness. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: This workshop will present an overview of the framework and foundational mind training practices of Compassion Focused therapy and clinical strategies that facilitate safeness to address underlying shame and self- criticism with clients. Participants will engage in compassion practices used in CFT, self-practice, self- enquiry and small group discussion. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Mindful attending with an affectionate attitude enables clients to see the otherwise invisible patterns at the root of their suffering. Compassion focused interventions develop interceptive awareness and work by increasing the ability to stay with difficult sensations and phenomenon and train abilities to respond to context and emotions and life experiences in non-blaming, compassionate ways. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Compassionate Focused therapy utilizes mind training strategies to change the set point of emotional responding and suffering created by shame and self-criticism.
 

1037: Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy Empowerment Strategies for Self-injury and Aggression – Building Connection, Developing Aspirations, Strengthening Resiliency, Enabling Purpose
Joseph Keifer, Psy.D, BSN, RN; Ellen Inverso, Psy.D; Paul Grant, Ph.D

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Self-injury and aggressive behavior are challenges that can lead to a sense of helplessness, both for nursing staff and individuals with serious mental health conditions. Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy (CT-R) provides nurses with strategies and know-how to collaborate effectively to empower individuals relative to these significant impediments to their desired life. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Research and clinical practice support the role of connection, consistency, and control when working with an individual vulnerable to self-injure or act aggressively. Richly developed life aspirations become the source of purpose lived every day. The positive emotion and image of these aspirations become a counterweight to urges and impulses evoked by life’s challenges. Aspirations provide a context for working on empowerment, achieving success in daily life, and strengthening of positive beliefs that enable the individual to flourish. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: Through predictable, equalizing activities, nurses connect with individuals, discover their best self, and develop trust. Trust allows collaborative discovery and enrichment of aspirations. Aspirations guide active pursuit of a desired life. Empowerment comes through strengthening adaptive beliefs, which facilitate recovery and resiliency. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: CT-R has demonstrated efficacy, in a randomized trial and program evaluation of implementation studies, to improving the quality of life. There is a large literature supporting connection as a basic human need and the cognitive model for self-injury and aggressive behavior. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Conceptualizing and developing practical strategies for self-injury and aggressive behavior -- relevant to both registered nurses and advanced practice nurses. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Nurses will become more effective agents of change, empowering individuals challenged with self-injury or aggressive behavior.
 

1042: An Overview of Emotionally Focused Therapy: Application to Individuals, Couples, and Families
Debbie Steele, MFT, PhD, RN

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT) is unique because of the focus on emotions. The therapy is based on the Theory of Attachment which emphasizes the emotional ramifications of childhood adverse events (ACE) and serious mental disorders. Paradoxically, the most popular therapies utilized by clinicians focus on cognition and behavior. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Emotionally Focused Therapy was developed by Greenberg and Johnson in the early 1990's. Susan Johnson focused on couples who she videotaped and eventually discovered negative interactional patterns that kept them stuck in their disconnection and distress. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: EFCT is being taught and practiced by licensed clinicians throughout the world through the International Center of Excellence for Emotionally Focused Therapy (ICEEFT) located in Ottawa, Canada. Emotionally Focused Therapy has been found to be effective with individuals, couples, and families. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Multiple books and research articles have been published on the therapy, particularly in the Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy. Client outcomes are measure based on new emotional experiences with individual, couples, and families. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Advanced practices nurses need the opportunity to learn and practice EFT, which is consistent with the recovery care model being championed by them. EFT has been found to be effective in more than 70% of couple cases. It is effective for severe mental illness, providing a compassionate model of care. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: EFT is one of the new genre of therapies being practiced by mental health therapists because of its efficacy and holistic nature. Advanced practice nurses currently cannot pursue certification as Emotionally Focused Therapists currently. This needs to change.
 

1043: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners taking a Bottom up Approach in Helping to Heal Anxiety, Inattention and other Common Ailments of Children; Discovering Trauma as a Factor Feeding into their Presentation
Anka Roberto, DNP, PMHNP-BC, APRN, MPH; Pamela Lusk, DNP, RN, FAANP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Children are far too often prescribed psychotropic medications for anxiety and/or adhd symptoms that many times can be resolved with trauma focused psychotherapy by PMHNP's . Trauma screening and trauma focused psychotherapy provides a true holistic approach in caring for this vulnerable population. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Many times trauma symptoms mimic those of adhd and anxiety (Biederman et al.,2013). Providers failing to conduct a thorough trauma screening miss the opportunity to help treat such symptoms. Utilizing the adaptive information processing (AIP) model and EMDR has been show to be more efficacious than anti-anxiety agents (de Jongh & Ten, 2009). DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: EMDR provides resolution of anxiety related symptoms by targeting triggers which cause the mind to respond maladaptively reducing anxiety and adhd symptoms. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Notable significant decrease in anxiety and adhd like symptoms by parent/school report with a return to school, sports and social environments (case reports). RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners are often seen as "prescribers", when in fact they can develop the skill set to provide evidence based trauma informed therapy. Psychiatric nurse practitioners who use their full scope of practice in caring for children with trauma related symptoms have better outcomes and shorter time in therapy with children and families. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners can become trauma focused holistic providers who embrace the entire patient during therapy sessions allowing for all pieces of the child and family to be utilized while in their care. Become trained in EMDR can transform the trajectory of a PMHNP's caseload resolving many symptoms for children without the use of psychotropics.
 

1044: How Students Perceive Their Psych Clinical Rotation and Why It Matters
Todd Hastings, PhD, MS, RN; Mary Justice, PhD, RN, CNE; Paula Harrison, MSN, RN; Janice Sanders, DNP, RNC, CPNP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Nurse educators express concern over how to improve or better assist in selection and structure of clinical agencies to support positive psychiatric mental health (PMH) clinical experiences for undergraduate students. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Nurse educators report student nurses have expressed negative feedback over a range of structural, process, and interpersonal factors associated with the site of their clinical practicums. Many nurse educators state a need for a good tool and process to better examine student nurse feelings about the clinical experience in support of a better educational opportunity. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: The design of an appropriate questionnaire/survey to examine student nurse perceptions of the PMH clinical experience is described. Members of the Pre-Licensure Branch of the APNA Education Council will present a questionnaire informed by nurse educators. The process of creating the questionnaire (design, collaboration, and context) will be presented. Holistic foundations of the Nursing Metaparadigm and Bandura’s adult social learning theory are indicated as foundations in support of question development and student reflection about learning experiences. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Validation processes for the utility of the questionnaire include surveying nurse educators nationally and piloting of questions at select academic institutions. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Nurse educators teaching psychiatric nursing value the results of this collaboration in support of new knowledge regarding a tool to measure better student impressions of the PMH clinical rotation. Best practices in nursing education to teach psycho-social and holistic nursing are considered relative to the process and product. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Nurse educators will use the questionnaire to inform their efforts in seeking and framing clinical practicum experiences for undergraduate students.
 

1045: More Than Words Can Say: The Impact of Music on Mood, Behavior, and Emotional Resiliency
David Horvath, PhD, PMHNP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Popular American music has undergone significant stylistic and structural changes over the past 80 years. These changes may be viewed as a "disintegration" of popular song form, harmonic complexity, and a lyrical sentiment. The purpose of this presentation is to examine these changes and the potential negative impact on the mental health of listeners, particularly children and adolescents. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Studies indicate that there has been a steady and significant decline in the mental health of adolescents over the past 80 years, and in particular, the past 2 decades. Surprisingly, these data correlate with measurable changes in the structure and complexity of popular music, from "Top 40 songs" to TV commercials. It is hypothesized that listening to simplistic, repetitive musical patterns such as the ones prominent in such music may have a deleterious effect on mood, motivation and overall mental health DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: Curently, little or no consideration is devoted to the listening habits of consumers of popular (Top 40) music and the potential impact on cognition and emotion. An enhanced awareness of how quality musical experiences can shape the mental health patients may be useful to the psychiatric nurse. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Despite a paucity of data on the relationship of current popular music and mental health, numerous studies validate the effect of musical listening experiences on mood and behaviour in various populations. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: PMH nurses are in an ideal position to influence the listening habits of their patients. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Patients who engage in quality music listening experiences are likely to have fewer mental health issues.


1046: Critical Reflection in Nursing Practice and Education: An Interactive Workshop for Clinicians and Educators
Rosalind De Lisser, APRN, FNP-BC, PMHNP-BC; Katerina Melino, MS, PMHNP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Building self-reflective capacity in PMH nursing students is key to supporting learning, building resilience, enhancing communication, and ensuring awareness of one's capacity. This interactive workshop will provide foundations of critical-reflection as a tool for building self-reflective capacity in trainees using both verbal and written approaches. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Critical-reflection in nursing practice is a process of "analyzing, questioning, and reframing a personal experience to enhance learning and inform future behavior." Written and verbal reflection allow purposeful integration of one's own experience with didactic and clinical experience as trainees acquire competency. Critical-reflection is built on the model of Transformative Learning as a change process involving new knowledge and skills while transforming perspective through active reflection. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: The workshop will use of transformational learning as a framework to engage attendees in participation of both verbal and written critical-reflection. They will then learn how to use critical reflection in the classroom and in the clinical setting as well as how to evaluate written reflections considering content and depth of reflection. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: The written critical-reflection process will be presented and practiced. Importance of feedback is reviewed. Example reflection will be presented applying the use of a rubric as an evaluation tool. The rubric is provided to participants to use. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: CR ensures deliberate and meaningful acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for 21st century nursing practice while also facilitating active engagement in the process of learning. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Self-reflective capacity is considered a building block to resilience, a necessary skill to prevent burnout.


1046: Critical Reflection in Nursing Practice and Education: An Interactive Workshop for Clinicians and Educators
Rosalind De Lisser, APRN, FNP-BC, PMHNP-BC; Katerina Melino, MS, PMHNP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Building self-reflective capacity in PMH nursing students is key to supporting learning, building resilience, enhancing communication, and ensuring awareness of one's capacity. This interactive workshop will provide foundations of critical-reflection as a tool for building self-reflective capacity in trainees using both verbal and written approaches. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Critical-reflection in nursing practice is a process of "analyzing, questioning, and reframing a personal experience to enhance learning and inform future behavior." Written and verbal reflection allow purposeful integration of one's own experience with didactic and clinical experience as trainees acquire competency. Critical-reflection is built on the model of Transformative Learning as a change process involving new knowledge and skills while transforming perspective through active reflection. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: The workshop will use of transformational learning as a framework to engage attendees in participation of both verbal and written critical-reflection. They will then learn how to use critical reflection in the classroom and in the clinical setting as well as how to evaluate written reflections considering content and depth of reflection. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: The written critical-reflection process will be presented and practiced. Importance of feedback is reviewed. Example reflection will be presented applying the use of a rubric as an evaluation tool. The rubric is provided to participants to use. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: CR ensures deliberate and meaningful acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for 21st century nursing practice while also facilitating active engagement in the process of learning. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Self-reflective capacity is considered a building block to resilience, a necessary skill to prevent burnout.
 

1047: Group 101: A Toolkit of Theory and Skills for Novice Group Leaders
Bethany J Phoenix, PhD, RN, CNS; Frannie Pingitore, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, CGP

ABSTRACT
PROBLEM STATEMENT:
Psychiatric mental health nurses at all levels of practice lead groups across the continuum of care. These include inpatient, outpatient, psychoeducation, medication, support and interpersonal process groups. However, many nurses receive little training in effective group leadership. Without basic knowledge of group facilitation skills, the therapeutic benefits of group participation are not fully realized and PMH nurses may find leading groups frustrating or unfulfilling. SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE: Literature reviews have established that group mental health treatment is as effective or more effective than individual treatment, and is more cost-effective. Yalom's (2005) research on the benefits of therapy groups identified 11 therapeutic factors that are responsible for the positive results achieved with group treatment. Nurse group leaders who understand these factors can foster their emergence across different types of therapeutic groups. DESCRIPTION OF PRACTICE OR PROTOCOL: This workshop will review literature on the benefits of participation in therapeutic groups, phases of group development, leader strategies and therapeutic group processes. The workshop will include an experiential group simulation in which participants will experience group dynamics from the perspective of group members and observe how leaders structure and facilitate the group process. VALIDATION OF EVIDENCE: Session participants will be asked to reflect on what they learned in the workshop and how they will apply it in their clinical practice. RELEVANCE OF PMH NURSING: Groups are a powerful and effective way to meet the needs of multiple patient populations with which PMH nurses work. FUTURE IMPLICATIONS: Through greater understanding of group structure and therapeutic processes, PMH nurses can become more effective in establishing and leading different types of therapeutic groups.

 

3141 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 625
Falls Church, VA 22042
© 2019 American Psychiatric Nurses Association. All Rights Reserved.
Contact Us|Terms of Service
Toll Free: 855-863-APNA (2762)
Fax: 855-883-APNA (2762)
AMERICAN PSYCHIATRIC NURSES ASSOCIATION and APNA-Logoare registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office as trademarks of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.
The American Psychiatric Nurses Association is accredited with distinction as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.